Burnout Support and Prevention Resources: Are There Enough?

Mental health is a widely discussed topic, especially in connection to workplace burnout. These days, more people are inclined to share their stories and the world is ready to listen with the assistance of burnout support and prevention resources. 

Burnout is a result of emotional, physical, and mental exhaustion that is usually caused by prolonged stress. This happens when you’re overwhelmed, drained, and unable to meet constant daily demands. We live in a technological world that’s invested in high-speed, digital connections, and social media. However, all of this can work against usmaking us feel isolated. We lose touch with real connections to the people and nature around us because we are afraid of missing out online. Not to mention, jobs commonly use technology as a way to stay connected with their workers. All the time. This leaves employees feeling like they need to be reachable at all hours of the day, meaning they work far more than they should.

A Legitimized Occupational Phenomenon 

Now that the World Health Organization recognizes workplace burnout as a legitimate occupational issue, we see a rise in support and prevention resources available. People have a name for what they are dealing with. They can research their symptoms and discover that they’re not alone. Many employees find themselves facing burnout. According to the World Health Organization, workplace burnout symptoms include: 

  • Reduced professional success
  • Increased mental distance from one’s job
  • Feelings of energy depletion
  • Feelings of cynicism related to one’s job

If you experience one or more of these, then you may be on your way to burning out. Lucky for you, there are burnout support and prevention resources ready and available.

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Support and Prevention Resources

Whether you are an employer or an employee, there are many signs to look out for in coworkers regarding burnout.

Firstly, burnout symptoms can be difficult to spot, especially when you’re more focused on your to-do list rather than what your coworkers are doing. However, the use of certain written and verbal language can reveal what a person is feeling. By keeping an eye on the way your coworkers communicate, you can determine if anyone around you is facing workplace burnout. For more information on recognizing symptoms, check out these articles by the Globe and Mail and Fast Company

Secondly, a way to help prevent burnout is to interact with people outside of the digital world. For example, show an interest in your coworkersget to know someone on a personal level rather than maintaining a business-centric relationship. This can create a positive work atmosphere for both you and your coworker. For more information on daily prevention methods, check out this article by Inc.

Lastly, learn to identify burnout as you’re facing it. This can be done by asking the right questions: Have I taken on too much? What’s draining me? What’s distracting me from my work? What do I do outside of work? Do I say “yes” too often? Am I making my self-care a priority? For more information on how to identify burnout in yourself, read here. Additionally, Workplace Strategies for Mental Health offers great insights into burning out within a work environment. 

Furthermore, employers are beginning to recognize the benefits of a four-day workweek and less meeting-filled workdays. Microsoft implemented the four-day workweek as a trial and saw enormous benefits. Productivity skyrocketedboosted by 40%. So, it appears that we are far more productive when we have less on our plates.

Can We Do More To Help?

The simple answer is yes, we can always do more to help people as well as ourselves. Although the issue of burnout is increasingly brought up, there are not enough resources helping people face workplace burnout as they’re currently dealing with it. If you are facing workplace burnout, here are online resources to help you treat it right now:

If you’re facing burnout, don’t just go with it. Do something about it. You don’t want this issue to snowball into a bigger health problem. So, find the resources you need to make it better. They’re out there. 

For more advice, check out Bouncing Back From Burnout.

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